Beef Stew

Another day, another stew. I promise you I have some recipes that don’t require beef stock and a spoon coming soon…

But not today. Today I’m going to belly flop into another one of my favorite fall dishes: Beef Stew. Growing up I loved this meal with the exception of one major component: The stew meat. I am just about the furthest thing away from a vegetarian, but I almost considered eating my stew sans the stew meat.

Then, the light bulb turned on. You know what other meal I love? Pot Roast. Pot Roast & Beef Stew have similar qualities, so I decided to marry the two and it is one of my prouder decisions in my 26 years of life.

This particular day, due to time restraints, I started my Pot Roast in the crock pot before coming home and transferring it to my dutch oven. I don’t love crock pots (have you NOT seen “This is us?!”) I’m not only afraid of starting a massive house fire. I’m also, just maybe, a teeeeeeny tiny bit OCD and need to tend to/check on/taste my food every three seconds. If you’re not quite as controlling as I am, you can most certainly cook this entire Pot-Roast-Stew in your crock pot. Just add everything below to your slow cooker (instead of a dutch oven) and cook on low heat for 8 hours.

My favorite thing about stews & soups is that they are so dang “busy-parent” friendly. You can prep all your peeling and chopping of vegetables the night before, you can throw everything in a slow cooker and “set it & forget it,” you can freeze portions & thaw them for a cook-free weeknight dinner.

What You’ll Need:

  • 4-5 pound Pot Roast
  • 1 – 12 oz. can of Beer (I used an Oktoberfest)
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of Butter
  • 4 cloves of Garlic, minced
  • 1 – 6 oz. can of Tomato Paste
  • 1 – 32 oz. carton of low-sodium Beef Stock
  • 2 medium Red Onions, quartered or one bag of frozen White Pearl Onions
  • 4-5 medium Red Potatoes, chopped into bite size pieces
  • 4 Carrots, peeled & chopped
  • 3 stalks of Celery, chopped
  • 1 bag of frozen Peas
  • 3 fresh Bay Leaves
  • 1 tablespoon fresh Parsley, chopped
  • 1/2 – 1 tablespoon Thyme
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • Thickening Agent (corn starch, flour, arrowroot powder) + water
    • You can change the amounts of vegetables for your family’s preference (i.e. if you’re a big potato guy, but hate onions – alter the recipe to fit you!)

 

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  • Place your Pot Roast at the bottom of your slow cooker along with the half of the onions, 2 tablespoons of butter, 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire, 1 can of beer, bay leafs, garlic, & thyme. Cover your crock pot and cook on low for 4 hours.

*This is when I transfered mine to a dutch oven for a more controlled cook. if you prefer to finish yours in the slow cooker, just add all remaining ingredients and cook for an additional 4 hours on low heat.

  • Carefully remove your pot roast from the slow cooker and place into your dutch oven. Pour remaining contents on top.
  • Add 32 ounces of beef stock, potatoes, onions, carrots, celery,  and parsley.
  • Dump in your can of tomato paste and stir well. Cover your dutch oven and let simmer on low heat for 3 hours, stirring occasionally.

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  • After three hours have passed, carefully remove your pot roast from your stew. Using a fork, shred apart (this should be very easy, if not place pot roast back in dutch oven and continue to simmer). After you’ve shredded the entire roast, add it back into the vessel.

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  • Add 1 tablespoon of thickening agent (I use arrowroot powder) to 1/2 cup of cold water, whisk until dissolved. While stirring your stew, add mixture slowly. Continue until you reach desired consistency.
  • Lastly, I’ll add in peas. I let these thaw on the countertop for a few hours. This is always my last step because frozen peas can become overcooked and mushy very easily.
  • Cover your dutch oven and let simmer for 1 additional hour.

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  • Your Pot-Roast-Stew is ready to enjoy and I just know that you’re going to love it!

Bon Appétit!

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